Parenting Manifesto

The true history of all society is the history of parenting.

Parents have always seemed to be in charge, but every generation has faced a revolution of children growing up and taking charge—only to be usurped by the next generation.

To end the entrenched strife of anxious children and unhappy parents caregivers must see that they are as much child as parent—and that parenting (i.e. caring for others and the world) is enlightened Self-interest that sets us free via an expanded consciousness.

Thus a parenting attitude brings feelings of harmony, community and more widespread stability and well-being.

In order to liberate parenting from the yoke of experts and materialist exploitation of insecurity about the most important job any of us ever do, and which we so deeply yearn to get right, caregivers must unite in a common consciousness that sees all children as all of our collective children.

We must take judgment of other parents out of our hearts and instead leap into the possibility that all parents love their children.

Those who fail to manifest that love with consistent and compassionate parenting are themselves in need of love and support in order to heal, and to in turn compensate for their limitations so that their children will not be wounded and/or continue cycles of hurt and abuse.

Good parenting is not about knowing what to do (instincts guide us on that); rather it’s about finding the patience, courage, resilience and compassion to be our best Selves… consistently.  Thus the kindest thing we can do if we want to support children everywhere is to support each other as parents to be our best Selves in all that we do.

It is cool to be kind.

People who feel good about themselves are generally kind.

All kids are all our children.

Relationship is everything.

The metaphoric bowl of Self is parenting’s primary tool.

Parenting, if engaged mindfully, is a path to happiness.

Parenting is also a potential path to whatever we might call spiritual enlightenment.

Parenting is a common language that unites people across all cultures, socio-economic levels and religious faiths—a potential unifying factor to trump all other differences (a parenting attitude even aligns us with earth and all its creatures).

Parenting teaches us how to love another beyond our self.

In this way parenting expands our consciousness, our sense of identity and offers a perspective in which our very identity might widen to become one with the world, freeing us of the burdens of the ego with its unending fears and desires and tumbling us into the sublime and ever-present eternal moment (so often spoken of and so rarely lived).

Parenting is a “micro” phenomenon through which great change is possible.

Parenting, as an attitude, is a viable way to change individual and world consciousness and thus benefit each of us and all our collective children.

Namaste, Bruce

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14 Responses to “Parenting Manifesto”

  1. Jack Says:

    Parenting, as an attitude, is a viable way to change individual and world consciousness and thus benefit each of us and all our collective children.

    This is so very true.

  2. BigLittleWolf Says:

    As manifestos go, I’d say this is splendid. And more importantly, within the reach of all of us.

  3. Kelly Says:

    I love this. I need to print it and post it and read it daily. I often forget the big picture — not just with my kids, but with all the kids in this world. What a loving reminder.

  4. Beth K Says:

    Ben, a school friend of my son’s, orally invited a few friends to a birthday sleepover at his house on two occasions last month. He didn’t mail or bring invitations, so the first time nobody came. The day before the second attempted party date, his mother and I happened to meet up at the school (our first meeting ever), and she said the party was the next night.
    Most of the other parents wouldn’t let their kids go, because they hadn’t heard from Ben’s parents. My husband was away at a conference, and I struggled with my decision. I let Jeremy go, and when I dropped him off, no other kids had arrived. I called later in the evening to talk to Jeremy, and one other kid had come.
    I later found out that the parents are newly divorced, which could explain some of the disorganization. I’m so glad I let Jeremy go, and that the small group of boys had fun. It’s sad to think of a child in a divorce situation missing out on the normal childhood events.

    • privilegeofparenting Says:

      Great example of widening our perspective on who are kids ultimately are. This was more than a fun B-day for Ben, it modeled for him that others do care, it supported his overwhelmed parents where they were limited to attend to his party and it models for Jeremy being loving and inclusive and not giving up on people. Just the ticket, I think.

  5. brian Says:

    i love how you defined parenting…and yes we have the opportunity to love many and in doing so help parents everywhere…

  6. Traci Says:

    Parenting teaches us how to love another beyond our self.

    Well said. Very well said.

    Traci

  7. bluecottonmemory Says:

    I have seen parents who support only their children with a cut-throat mentality – willing to destroy any other child who dares take their kids place in a starting line-up, on a field of sports, social groups – any group that is competitive. And, it grieves my spirit – because I was once a child who needed spiritual parenting. If parents cannot “love” beyond your children, that is not really loving. Loving spills over from yourself, into your children and into the lives you and your children touch.

    It was so true when you said, “Thus the kindest thing we can do if we want to support children everywhere is to support each other as parents to be our best Selves in all that we do.”

    Support – being kind, opening your heart – it makes everywhere a much better place!!

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